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The Indie Maximum Exposure 100


Thursday
Oct222009

80: The Chillcast: The Largest Podcast For Chillout & Electronica

The Chillcast is a weekly music podcast featuring. Hand picked podsafe music hosted by Anji Bee, vocalist of Lovespirals. Anji Bee is a Southern California vocalist, lyricist, podcaster and vidcaster. She is one half of the indie band, Lovespirals. Anji’s podcast gets tens of thousands of downloads per show and Anji is always looking to discover great new artists in the genres listed.     

Genres: Chillout, electronica, worldbeat, soul, and jazz. http://www.thechillcast.com

- Ariel Hyatt

www.arielpublicity.com

Thursday
Oct222009

81: The Mothpod Podcast: Featuring Emerging Artists

It was on that day that Internet DJ Zack “The Mothman” Daggy formed The Mothpod. Featuring bands and artists from both near and far, established and emerging, signed and unsigned; The Mothpod presents only he best and brightest talent that the music industry has to offer. New episodes are available for download every Monday. Also check back for Music Video Wednesdays, Artist Spotlight Fridays, and Moth Pick of the Week Sundays. http://www.mothpodproductions.com

- Ariel Hyatt

http://www.arielpublicity.com

 

Thursday
Oct222009

82: Discover Overplay: UK based Indie Website

When I posted on Overplay, I got international perspective on my music, I won their Play & Rate Competition and I got offered a distribution deal for my upcoming indie release as well as a recording contract for future albums by UK based record label, Maddie Records www.overplay.co.uk

- Jennie Walker

http://www.jenniewalker.com

Thursday
Oct222009

83: Go To Australia: Use WhoTune

Post music on WhoTune indie band site out of Perth Australia and get to know the Managing Director, Karl George.I submitted my song “Night Flight to London” and it was featured in “You Gotta Hear” listing, rose to #1 on Top 20 song list. As a result, I was asked to create radio promo spots, participate in interview and also serve as a DJ for the station and music is now used on their Internet radio station and for promos in their business development activities. http://www.whotune.com

 - Jennie Walker

http://www.jenniewalker.com

Thursday
Oct222009

84: Get A “Take Five” Feature Interview on All About Jazz , one of the largest Jazz Por- tals Online

If you are a jazz musician looking to get some extra exposure look to All About Jazz. They have a free way for you to further raise the awareness of your music and your- self if you would like to be featured on this wonderful site it’s very easy. Just logon and fill out their online questionnaire and get instant content to add to your press kit/ Sonic Bids profile. All About Jazz will promote your Take Five questions and answers on the AAJ home page and link to it from your AAJ musician profile.

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/submit_take_five.php

- Ariel Hyatt


www.arielpublicity.com

 

Thursday
Oct222009

85: Join the Remix Culture at CCMixter

Letting people remix your songs is an exciting way to get exposure for your music. Go to sites like ccmixter.org, put up your tracks, and see where your music can go. The tracks will be released under Creative Commons licenses, which allow people to re- mix your music, although you’ll keep the original rights, and they’ll have to attribute if they use your music. Some bands have been so successful at this that they released entire albums of remixes of their music. And the remixers of course promoted it to their fans.

- Randy Chertkow

http://randycon.org/


 

Thursday
Oct222009

86: Twitter Karma: Piggyback Off Similar Bands on Twitter to Grow Followers

When you target new people to follow, it is always wise to make sure they already like your genre of music. If you somewhat sound like Radiohead, wouldn’t it make sense to target the followers of their various Twitter profiles? For the people who do not follow you back, check out Twitter Karma. It allows you to ‘bulk unfollow’ anyone who has not followed you back; it’s a great tool for Twitter maintenance. http://dossy.org/ twitter/karma/

- Chris Gesualdi


 

Thursday
Oct222009

87: Use Indieguide to Find What You Need

 

Keeping track of all of these sites, tools, and resources seems like a full time job. Fortunately, IndieGuide.com does exactly that by organizing all of the links into easy- to-use categories. You can read the blog (blog.indieguide.com) to see suggestions for resources and tools, or use IndieGuide.com to locate the website you need, whether it’s print-on-demand CD stores, copyright resources, merchandise manufacturers, or places to get your music played, this is a site worth exploring.

- Randy Chertkow

http://randycon.org/

 

Thursday
Oct222009

88: Forget iTunes Features

I used to work for Apple on the corporate level, so I’m an informed source on this one. Truly, stop wasting time trying to get featured on iTunes, and don’t believe distributors who say they will get you featured. Here’s why: iTunes features two kinds of music. Music that will sell like mad (Madonna, Taylor Swift, NOT unknown indie artists), and music that is catching the ear of the staff, whether it’s popular or not. It is one of the only music stores around that truly lets the staff select taste-based features, but there are millions of us and a very, very few of them, so unless your dad or wife or the person you donated a kidney to is an iTunes content producer, getting picked for a feature runs the same odds as winning the lottery. Best approach is to pray your song catches their ear and go spend your time on a task that can offer some return.

- Phil Putnam


http://www.philputnam.com/

 

Thursday
Oct222009

89: Consider Fan Financed Recordings/Projects

As the fan base grows, so does their desire to see an artist succeed. Last year, Shane wanted to record and went out to the fans for support. See http://www.teamtrance.com. This effort raised just over $34,000 in just 60 days.

- Michele Samuel


 

Thursday
Oct222009

90: Start Your Own Subscription Service

In October of 2008 I started my own subscription service– http://www.matthewebel. net –with no clue whether the fans would like it or not. Part of the offerings were two new songs and one live concert recording every month. It seemed like a tall order to me, but something I could accomplish. Little did I realize that new releases every two weeks would be better than any good album reviews or press coverage. Giving my fans something new to talk about every two weeks meant exactly that: they talk about me every two weeks. They’re not buying an album, raving about it, and losing interest after a few months, they’re constantly spreading my name to their Twitter followers, coworkers, pets, etc. Regular delivery of quality material is damn near my one-step panacea for the whole industry.

- Matthew Ebel


 

Thursday
Oct222009

91: Legally Record & Sell Cover Tunes

Singer/songwriter Steve Acho realized that fans who love a particular song will often collect other versions of the favorites. After getting the proper publishing licenses, he would record new arrangements of songs popular by various artists, and release them on iTunes via TuneCore. When a song-collecting fan enjoyed one of his tunes, they would often also buy his originals.

- Carla Lynne Hall

www.carlalynnehall.com


 

Thursday
Oct222009

92: TV/Film/ Game Licensing - aka SYNCH Licensing

The Billboard Maximum 100 article was ba-na-nas off base overall, but they were on the right track with Synch Licensing. If you own the copyrights of your music (if you don’t, you’re a complete moron, leave the music business now) placements of your music in TV/Film/Games is a vital part of your long-term financial success. There are about 900,000 shows besides Grey’s Anatomy and Gossip Girl that need music, and there’s no reason why your music can’t be the right pick. As you dive into these waters, remember two things: THEY need YOU, and a Music Supervisor needs the right song for their show more than they need a household name singing it.

- Phil Putnam

http://www.philputnam.com

 

Thursday
Oct222009

93: Sign With More Than One Licensing Agency

Licensing Agencies have relationships with TV/Film production companies and work to get their clients’ music placed in TV shows and films. The beauty of this is that a contract with a Licensing Agency is non-exclusive, according to current industry standard. That means you can sign with a few agencies and have them all work- ing to place your music. It may add some more work for you on the admin side, but can payoff on the paycheck side. Note, however, that standard cut for the Licensing Agency is 50%, so if you can get placements without them, do it. And never sign an exclusive Licensing contract.

- Phil Putnam

http://www.philputnam.com

 

Thursday
Oct222009

94: Create iMixes at iTunes & Sell More Music

With artists that compliment your music and artists you get compared to. Add in some top sellers as well to ensure popular music buying choices are in your iMix. The key here is: include your music. This will be putting you exactly where you want to be: in harm’s way! Online where people have their credit cards out and are ready to buy music. http://www.tinyurl..com/arielitunes

- Ariel Hyatt

http://www.arielpublicity.com

Jazz guitarist Cameron Mizell developed a technique of creating iTunes iMixes that featured one song of his among other songs in his genre. iMix lovers would discover his tunes, and buy them as well.

- Carla Lynne Hall

http://carlalynnehall.com

 

Thursday
Oct222009

95: Make Merchandise for $0

Sell merch for free, and make money on every sale With sites like Cafepress.com, Spreadshirt.com, and Zazzle.com, you can upload pictures that can be printed on all sorts of merch. The stores are available for free, and you’ll make money each time a fan makes a purchase. You can use sites like this to find out what designs are the most popular in case you want to do a mass printing to have an inventory of your own to bring to shows.

- Randy Chertkow

http://randycon.org/

 

Thursday
Oct222009

96: Let Fans Pay What They Want

Stop setting prices at shows for your merch, unless you already have a huge ‘brand’. Most fans are either buying memorabilia from the event to mark that they were there, or they are donating to support the band. Don’t put a price ceiling on them by limiting them. Let them pay what they want for that t-shirt and you will be rewarded with more money.

- Jed Carlson  

http://www.reverbnation.com

 

Thursday
Oct222009

97: Learn Tom Jackson’s Live Music Methods & Sell More Merch

Just like you learned how to play and sing, there are techniques and tools/ gear, theories, and concepts that make a great performer. I’ve seen Tom in action and I have interviewed artists who are making more money from merch sales at live shows directly by implementing Tom’s teachings. Everyone is scratching their heads trying to figure out what will make them money and Tom Jackson will make you more money. http:// www.onstagesuccess.com 

- Ariel Hyatt

http://arielpublicity.com/


 

Thursday
Oct222009

98: Keep Detailed Financial Records

If you aren’t keeping stock of what expenditures got you a worthwhile return you will run out of money even quicker than most.

- Rick Goetz

Thursday
Oct222009

99: Invest in Your Own Career to The Best of Your Ability

You need to spend a certain amount of money to appear professional so while barter- ing is encouraged if you have big gaping holes in your marketing material or image - spend the money on yourself. Be it a professional website, a well written bio, profes- sional sounding recordings, quality press photos etc.

- Rick Goetz