In Defense Of The Facebook Group: Fostering Community And Engagement In Music Through Connections Online 
March 5, 2018
Kenzie Fitzpatrick in American Football, American Hearts, Facebook, Facebook groups, Fans, Marketing, Piebald, Social Media, emo, music community
As frustrating as the social media site’s ever-changing algorithms may be, as of 1/1/18, there are 2.072 billion users on Facebook. While we all roll our eyes at one aspect of Facebook or another on a near-daily basis, there’s no denying that we’re drawn to it like moths to a flame. We know in our heads that it’s a time and productivity suck…and yet we continue to scroll through our respective feeds endlessly. 
And, if you’re a music fan, industry professional, or hobbyist in 2018, though you may think about deactivating your account from time to time to get away from those creepy, seemingly mind-reading ads, chances are you’re not going anywhere any time soon. Because, as frustrating as it is, Facebook continues to play an integral role in the music industry. Yes, even in 2018.  
In addition to the industry as a whole, Facebook also has a part in our personal connections to music – both in our local communities and music scenes and across the globe. And, one of the easiest ways to connect and interact with like-minded people on Facebook is through groups. For example, you may, like myself, be a member of the emo group Americ anFootballposting.  
The very existence of groups like these provides several benefits to musicians, fans, professionals, and hobbyists alike. They help foster a sense of community within the scene, increase engagement with music, and allow people to do what they’re ultimately on this planet to: make connections. 
Create Community 
Facebook groups dedicated to music allow like-minded individuals to communicate with one another. Whether you make a friend in the group who lives locally (and thus translates into an IRL friendship), or you meet someone who lives thousands of miles away, Facebook groups make it feel as though they’re in the same room as you. Sure, you might be communicating in ALL CAPS on the comment section of a dumb meme, but you’re also taking part in the cultivation of a new community. 
Increase Engagement 
For musicians, promoters, and industry professionals, music-oriented Facebook groups offer yet another way to engage with fans. By creating posts about their music or events and posting them to the group, fans who otherwise might not have had the opportunity can now engage and be a part of the conversation. Additionally, fans can share their favorite music with one another – furthering engagement with acts they love – and making connections in the process. 
Promote Connection 
It’s no secret that Facebook promotes connection between its users no matter how you use the site. Facebooks groups, however, provide their users with a constant stream of activity and many different conversations they can participate in if they so choose. See a thread about your favorite band’s best song? “Love” it, comment on it, or continue scrolling and interact with the next post, if you want to.  
With their far reach and diverse user base, Facebook groups give music scenes all over the world a real sense of community. In reality, though? The most popular posts could easily be made by lonely, bedroom-dwelling teens who have few connections outside of the online world. But now, they get to be reminded that they, too, are part of it
Article originally appeared on Music Think Tank (
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